FIM News

Harvard Medical Engineering and Medical Physics Student Isha Jain Receives 2017 Weintraub Award

CAMBRIDGE, MA—In March, Harvard-MIT Health Sciences & Technology Medical Engineering and Medical Physics PhD student, Isha Jain, became one of only thirteen graduate students, worldwide, selected to receive the 2017 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award.

Isha Jain
Left: 2017 Weintraub Award Winner and Harvard PhD candidate Isha Jain. Middle: 15-year-old Isha wins a prestigious Intel Award. Right: A young Isha hoists the 2003 PA State Platinum Masters trophy she won in Harrisburg.

"It is such an honor to receive this award,” says Jain, who is originally from Bethlehem, PA. “It is really nice to have validation that you are working on interesting research problems that will hopefully one day have a biomedical impact. Disease relevance and the hope for therapies is the reason I am so drawn to science." Jain works in the lab of Professor Vamsi Mootha, focusing on mitochondrial disease.

The Weintraub Award recognizes outstanding achievement during graduate studies in the biological sciences. A committee of individuals from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center selects awardees based on the quality, originality and significance of their work.

Jain shares a special connection to First In Math, via her participation in—and domination of—the 24® Game Pennsylvania State 24 Challenge Championships in 2003. Barely big enough to hoist the Platinum Masters Division Championship trophy she won as a 7th-grader, Jain impressed everyone with her focus and determination. Among them was 24® Game and First In Math® creator Robert Sun.

“There are a few ‘24 kids’ who make such a lasting impression that they are remembered even after many years have passed,” says Sun. “Isha is one of them.”

“As a sophomore at Freedom High School, Isha placed fourth in the Zoology category of the Intel International Science and Engineering Research Fair,” recalls Sun. “She was quick to credit the role that maths skills played in her award-winning research.”


Son of Florida Math Teacher Shines
On “Who Wants to Be A Millionaire”

WESTON, FL (USA)—Marc Horowitz is a former maths teacher and current Curriculum Specialist at Indian Trace Elementary who has shepherded many children on to success, but none more so than his own son, who recently appeared as a contestant on the Who Wants To Be A Millionaire game show.

Charles Horowitz

According to Horowitz, the adventure began when he sent in an application for his son to audition for the show.  “When we were contacted, we were in shock,” laughs Horowitz. “Charles interviewed and auditioned via Skype, and before we knew it, he was chosen to be a contestant on the show.”

Horowitz says the experience was an incredible one, from stepping onto the Who Wants To Be A Millionaire stage in Las Vegas for the first time, to meeting host Chris Harrison.  “Every step of the process was exciting, although a bit nerve wracking.”

Charles was decidedly less nervous, and enjoyed being on stage. “Even though I experienced how stressful facing the cameras can be, I was confident, because my friends supported me the entire way, saying they knew I would do great.”

His appearance on the show created a lot of buzz, but a clip of Charles solving a difficult maths problem went viral nationwide after it was posted on the show’s Instagram account. (View clip here)

So where did Charles learn the ‘mad skills’ that Harrison spoke of after the 13-year-old calculated the correct solution to a difficult a math problem? His proud father takes some credit, but says he had an ally in the process.

“I strongly believe that First in Math was a driving force in my son’s early academics, as he participated in the program for four years,” explains Horowitz, whose classroom teams placed #1 in national competition in both 2009 and 2010. “First In Math helped him build the basics for all functions of maths, as well as algebra and solving for variables.”

According to Horowitz, one of the best things about First In Math is the fact that it is an enriching activity. “That means I was able to go beyond what was instructed in class with Charles, and with many of my other students, as well.”

Charles is now 14 years old. His hobbies include playing the clarinet, participating in National Junior Honor Society projects, and participating in environmental volunteer work around his school.

What does Charles think about his brief brush with stardom? “There are a lot of behind-the-scenes things I learned about—and it was one of the best experiences of my life!” Final Answer.


Changing the Shape of Learning

by Robert Sun

Learning is often viewed as a linear process. First, the thinking goes, students must be convinced they can complete a task. For kids who question their ability to learn, this is a big stumbling block. It puts the onus on teachers to find ways to overcome doubt, negative self-image and prior failures.

Robert Sun with Students

Next, teachers are expected to discover a way for children to become self-motivated. They must show their students a connection to prior learning, or find an intrinsic appeal in the subject matter. Only after these two steps have been accomplished are students considered ready to move on to the final step: learning something new.

The drawback with this approach is its narrow perspective. It places too many steps in sequence, with too many preconditions. Loaded with roadblocks, it makes effective learning difficult. A better model is to think of instruction not as a straight line but as a circle, with entry possible at any spot along the circumference.

Such a model is not only more flexible, but also more inviting to children of varying interests and abilities. Now “do” can be an entry point—as well as “want to do.”

A circular model also increases the ways in which a child can be motivated. The video game industry has used this paradigm to great effect, changing the culture of an entire generation.

Video games succeed because of their non-threatening, open, and self-reinforcing approach to acquiring new skills. First In Math’s digital content is designed to exploit the circular nature of learning using the same key attributes of popular video games: comprehensive content; multiple points of entry; high engagement; a seamless gradient of challenges; a sense of control; short cycle of play and the freedom to make mistakes.

When correctly applied, the circular pattern provided by digital learning games on the First In Math site can actually become a spiral, leading to ever-higher levels of math achievement. As all teachers know, negative attitudes can be self-reinforcing in children. The short cycle of play in a digital game, however, can solve the problem. One quick success presents the child with a question: “Do I go away, or do I continue?” Most will choose the Start button and continue.

When children admit to themselves, “I can do this,” it introduces a new feeling based on the natural response to previous success. Instead of worrying about the threat of a bad grade or a negative reaction from their teacher or parent, kids now think, “I did better than I thought I could, and perhaps I’ll do as well next time.” After working three decades with children and mathematics, my experience confirms that it is not motivation that creates action, but taking action that creates the motivation to do more.

Before long, success eliminates fear. A new perspective takes hold, and the spiral of progressive achievement becomes a reality.

There is no magic formula for maths success, but a top-quality tool like First In Math can provide an environment for the most overlooked aspect of maths instruction: practice. Like playing soccer or learning the piano, math is a skill that requires practice. When all the right attributes are in place, a digital game for math practice can be immensely effective. It’s up to us to provide that welcoming environment—and then let kids do what they do best: explore and learn for themselves.

ROBERT SUN is the CEO of Suntex International and inventor of First In Math, an online program designed for energizing every child to learn, love and live mathematics.


Robert Sun Speaks to Parents, Students
At Calypso Family Math Night

BETHLEHEM, PA—First In Math® creator Robert Sun visited Calypso Elementary and spoke with a crowd of more than 180 guests at the school’s Family Math Night. Pre-K through fifth-grade students and their parents, grandparents and siblings listened intently as Sun told them how math played an integral role in his unconventional journey to success.

Robert Sun visits Calypso ES
Inventor Robert Sun shared graphics of the new First In Math VIFs™ module, as well as personal photos, that help explain his journey to success.

Sun emigrated from China to West Philadelphia at age nine. One of four children being raised by a single parent, he struggled to learn English, but eventually connected to others through math.

Sun would go on to earn an Engineering degree from the University of Pennsylvania, but decided his true calling was to help students succeed in math. He invented the 24® Game in 1988, debuted the First In Math® Online Program in 2002, and has now introduced an addition to the First In Math arsenal—the Very Important Facts™ (VIFs™) System—to provide students with a strong base of knowledge in foundational math skills.  

After Sun spoke, students were given the opportunity to go to different tables—each table had games for them to play that were grade appropriate, including some from the 24® Game series. Student volunteers from Moravian College were stationed at the tables to help everything run smoothly.

Students could also go into the library to use Chromebooks and play First In Math, where FIM Project Coordinator Nancy Kane worked with students, parents and grandparents. “I had fun teaching families how to log in to First In Math at home,” says Kane. “At the end of the night, each family was given a 24® Game Anniversary Edition and a 24® Game bookmark to tie into Calypso’s Family Reading Night.”

Kane enjoyed the Reading Night posters of the children’s favorite stories displayed throughout the school. “They were very creative, well thought out and very artistic, clearly a lot of effort was put into them. It brought back memories of when my boys were young and were reading some of the same titles.”

According to Principal Kathy Bast, Calypso is the smallest school in the Bethlehem Area School District. It is truly a neighborhood school and retains a great sense of community.  “We understand that it makes for a long day when we hold this type of event in the evening, but it demonstrates how truly dedicated our families are, and how important their child’s education is to them.” Bast’s own daughter attends Palmer Elementary, but joined her mom after school so she could meet Sun.


Junior Journalists Report on First In Math

TELFORD, PA—Souderton Area School District’s Vernfield Elementary has a digital newspaper run by eager students and an amazing teacher, Cindy Edgar.

Young authors from Vernfield ES
Young authors (l to r) Tyler Lutz, Connor Klock, Brycen Clarke

Recently, three fourth-grade students—Brycen Clarke, Connor Klock and Tyler Lutz—asked to interview one of the school’s biggest First In Math proponents, Vernfield Elementary Technology Teacher & Integration Coach Jennifer Kling, to discuss the program.

“It is a simple article, but it is not hard to imagine how proud and invested these boys are about the content,” says Kling. “They are truly inspired to be journalists, and they want to spread the good news about how First in Math can help all students.”

“We hope that everyone liked the article, and that everyone at First In Math knows how much Vernfield students appreciate the luxury of being able experience deep practice with their First in Math subscriptions,” says Edgar, who teaches third grade.

First In Math creator, Robert Sun, says he is thankful for energetic educators like Edgar and Kling—the latter a long-time, avid supporter of First In Math. “I admire her work building high levels of math achievement with her students over the years.”

Enjoy their story, below, reprinted with permission:

First In Math
By Brycen Clarke, Connor Klock, Tyler Lutz

Do you want to learn about First in Math? You will find out in this article!

We sat down with Mrs. Kling to ask her about First in Math. The inventor of First in Math is Robert Sun who also created the math game 24®. He believes math is patterns and it is important how a number connects with other numbers. The First in Math Online Program is used by more than 10 million students in the United States and other countries too!

During the beginning of October, our school, Vernfield Elementary, was in 38th place in the whole state of Pennsylvania. First place in the state was St. Laurence School. The average stickers per student in St. Laurence School was 4,472. Will Stover, a fifth-grade student in our school was ranked 45th in our state. Way to go Will!  The top player in the nation in early October earned 37,568 points [stickers] and is from San Diego, California.


Practice Makes Perfect
When It Comes to Mathematics – Part Two

Part One of this article discussed factors that contribute to an important issue facing educators: studies show that up to 90% of what students are taught in school may be forgotten in as little as 30 days.

Practice - Part Two

In his book, Why Don’t Students Like School, Daniel Willingham discusses how humans have evolved a way to get around limitations in working memory capacity. Through repeated practice, our brains turn procedures into loops that become automatic and are stored in our long-term memory. Only when skills become automatic can they can be called upon and executed without taxing our working memory.To comprehend how and why students have such a low rate of retention—and how we can prevent it—we must recognize that new learning builds upon a scaffolding of old mastery, and nowhere is this more critical than in mathematics.

“Each unique module on the First In Math site is specifically designed to provide automaticity in the basics—at each level. With their skills stored in long-term memory, students can build upon that mastery, and find new approaches to problem solving,” explains First In Math creator Robert Sun.

While educators agree that the best way to achieve mastery is through practice, many of them would also agree that they simply do not have time to supervise that practice. According to Suntex Executive Vice President Nan Ronis, they don’t have to. “First In Math’s robust assessment features make it easy to see whether a student’s foundation of skills is adequate for the current curriculum.”

According to Ronis, scalable assessment tools—such as the FIM Goals Index—make it easy to gauge solidification of the scaffolding children have established by a certain point in time. Teachers can then interact with their students, if needed, and offer a risk-free way to quickly fill in any missing skills through targeted practice activities on the First In Math site.

The site also provides students with individualized MY GOALS, TEAM GOALS and SCHOOL GOALS pages that encourage independent review and motivate students to ‘level-up’ within the program. “Self-assessment is very effective once children comprehend that they need to build upon each skill they learn, explains former teacher and current FIM Implementation Specialist Monica Patel.

“In this, educators and parents must play a larger role,” says Patel. It is our duty to constantly remind students that their job is to become problem-solvers, and not just be memorizers of facts for the short term. It is important that we show children how each little achievement today will help them succeed in an even bigger way tomorrow.”


Practice Makes Perfect
When It Comes to Mathematics – Part One

Every teacher—and every parent for that matter—has seen it. The student who explained a geometry concept in class yesterday is panicking during today’s review of the very same topic. The young woman who completed her homework easily last week is completely confused this week.

FIM News & Notes - Practice Part One

How do students forget new skills so soon after they are taught?

In a recent article that appeared in Education Week’s online edition, Nicole Smith brings focus to the problem. “Whether it is a student who is struggling with remembering new knowledge or applying old knowledge, the problem is the same. New learning is heavily dependent upon old mastery, and quite often students are unable to access prior knowledge in order to move forward in their learning.” 

“The best way to achieve mastery is through practice, but that is something students are often reluctant to do where math is concerned,” explains First In Math creator Robert Sun. “In basketball, when we shoot a free-throw and miss, the feedback through our physical senses is immediate, and we make mental and physical adjustments before our next try. When a child is solving mathematics problems alone at home or on a worksheet in class, there isn’t any built-in feedback, and not much active learning. Math can quickly become a meaningless, boring undertaking for many students.”

In contrast, First In Math’s digital gaming modules encourage students to practice the way they willingly do for sports and other activities. “As a gaming-based practice program with short cycles of play, First In Math provides the lively interaction and instant feedback students crave, along with the amount of Deep Practice necessary for skill retention, according to Sun. “Students learn by repeating, reassessing and fine-tuning skills, and are able to continually analyze and internalize new approaches to problem solving.”

“Young minds must be able to build pathways of memory, and the only way to really do this is through creative, interactive repetition,” says former teacher and current FIM Implementation Specialist Monica Patel, who explains that practice—at three times the amount of instruction time—is necessary for students to master new math skills.

“This is where a comprehensive math-practice tool like First In Math is essential—there is simply nothing like it.”

Look for Part Two, to be published next week.


More than 20 Billion Math Problems
Solved on First In Math Site!

EASTON, PA—In homes, libraries and at schools large and small, students across the globe have helped the First In Math online program achieve another amazing milestone—20 BILLION math problems solved!

FIM Landing Page - 20 Billion 

First In Math creator Robert Sun was thrilled to see the total reach 20 billion at approximately 9 PM east-coast time on November 9th—and proud to know that the digital-gaming tool he launched in 2002 is clearly popular with students and teachers now more than ever.

Nearly 47% of time spent practicing math on the First In Math site occurs voluntarily, during after-school hours, and Sun believes it is because FIM allows each child to discover his or her ideal entry point to active learning. “In preserving a child’s ability to choose and explore, First In Math is able to offer content that contains real rigor within a framework that is not intimidating. This distinguishes us from all other math programs.”

At every skill level, First In Math modules are designed to reinforce mastery of basic facts, decimals, fractions, integers, exponents, variables and order of operations. Many introduce principles of Algebra—even at the K, 1 and 2 levels. Early introduction leads to enthusiasm and, according to Sun, is what brought students across the 20 BILLION threshold. “ALL students can become their own generators of energy and have passion for learning—given the right environment.”


Use Social Media Tools to Get People Talking About Math

EASTON, PA—Social media tools such as Twitter and Facebook have become a part of everyday life for most people—including educators—who recognize social media as a great way to celebrate student success, promote school goals, and communicate with other education professionals.

FIM Social Math

To paraphrase Wikipedia, social media “are computer-mediated technologies that allow individuals, companies, governments, and organizations to view, create and share information, ideas and interests via virtual communities and networks.”

First In Math Coordinator Nancy Kane (@Kane19Kane) believes it is that, and more. “Social media is one way educators can instantly connect with all of us at First In Math,” says Kane. “When we see a post on one of the First In Math® or 24® Game social media accounts about what a student, class or school has accomplished, it is really exciting, and we love to share their good news.”

Suntex President and FIM creator Robert Sun (@RobertSun24) employs social media to monitor what teachers and other educators around the globe are thinking and doing, in real-time. In addition to social media channels, Sun has allowed his perspectives on education to be published in leading media outlets, such as The Huffington Post, National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics Newsletter, eSchool News and The London Economic. Follow Sun’s Huffington Post articles

“We are excited to use tools such as Twitter and Facebook to communicate ideas and exchange information that may help and benefit our audience, because we feel it is extremely important to get teachers, parents and students talking about math,” says FIM Implementation Specialist Monica Patel (@AboutImpact).

Patel says that her desire to share ideas is strong but a busy schedule often interferes—making the spontaneity of social media a perfect solution. “If you have news or a math-related topic you’d like to discuss, it takes just a moment to get that conversation started.”

Follow First In Math® on Twitter: @FirstInMath 

Follow First In Math® on Facebook: FIM-Facebook

Follow 24® Game on Twitter:  @24game


Nursing Home Residents Are Gamers;
Love First In Math Website

MALVERN, PA—Sister Georgiana Connell I.H.M. has spent her whole life serving others, so it is no surprise that when she found herself unpacking her suitcase at Camilla Hall, a Convent home & healthcare center for Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, her first thought was “what can I do to help others while I am here?”

Sr. Georgiana and Camilla Hall
Left: Sister Marie Isabell listens intently as “Sister G” talks tech. Right: The Friday class always looks forward to their First In Math time.

Sister Georgiana teaches grades K through 4 Spanish at Sacred Heart School in Lancaster, PA. She is also Sacred Heart’s First In Math® Online Program coordinator, and has helped the tiny school become very successful on a national level, often placing among the National Top Ten Schools in the Small School category. She also plays, and was ranked 14th in the nation among all participating Educators in 2016.

While at Camilla Hall to rehabilitate a foot injury, she encouraged Sacred Heart students and teachers from a distance, but wanted to do more. “Camilla is blessed with dedicated employees who give their all for the Sisters, and they inspired me to help motivate some of the permanent residents in one of the best ways I know—through the First In Math program,” says Sr. Georgiana.

She got permission to use the laptop cart, and began regular classes every Friday to introduce and use the First In Math program. In addition to residents, some of the Sisters who work at Camilla Hall also joined the fun. Participants range in age from 50 to 90 years old.

Slowly, everyone noticed something magical was happening. First In Math became a topic of spirited discussion at lunch, or at other times when groups were gathered together. “Sisters like reviewing the math concepts as well as learning new things about computers,” according to Sr. Georgiana. “They’re having fun, and it has helped them develop another common bond.” The program became so popular that some Sisters were gifted new iPads so they could use the website whenever they wanted.

"It is a great joy to watch young students gain confidence as they learn, and it is the same here—age is irrelevant, everyone can learn," says Sister Georgiana. “First In Math is a perfect platform for any educational setting, because it’s not just the complete spectrum of math skills, the activities improve critical thinking, encourage creativity and keep the mind sharp.”

“Whether a person is 9 or 90, they are able to choose games that they can relate to, and this helps them master the skills they need,” explains Sister Georgiana. “Plus, First In Math’s friendly competition creates a wonderful camaraderie that can be invaluable—perhaps even priceless—in situations like this, as well as in the classroom.”

First In Math creator, Robert Sun, a long-time supporter of Sister Georgiana, sent a balloon bouquet along with his encouragement. “As a child, I was welcomed and supported by the Sisters of the IHM at St. Francis DeSales School in West Philadelphia, and they had a significant impact on my life and the direction I took in my career. I am so happy and proud to be in the position to continue to encourage this effort.”

Sister Georgiana returned to school in September, and says leaving Camilla Hall in July was bittersweet. But there is a plan in place. “Sister Pat Cabrey and Sister Barbara Bamberger are now coordinating the program and will continue with their own FIM Teams,” according to First In Math Project Coordinator Nancy Kane, who verified that Sun has donated licenses for two Camilla Hall Teams.

“Bringing First In Math to students around the world has been very rewarding—this opportunity to spread some excitement and challenge to the Sisters at Camilla Hall brings the feeling to a new level,” says Sun. “I truly appreciate all of the hard work, dedication and commitment these wonderful people bring to the lives of others.”


Texas International Baccalaureate School
Celebrates First In Math Success

HOUSTON, TX—Wilson Academy, part of the Aldine Independent School District, is proud to be home to the top-ranked First In Math team, among all sixth-grade teams, in Texas. They are also ranked 24th nationally at the sixth-grade level.

Wilson Academy Top Sixth-grade Team
Left to right: Sixth-grade Math Teacher and First in Math Team Leader Monica Leija; Christina Duong; Johnny Ho; Renny Hoang and Principal Dana Baker.

“I couldn’t wait to share the news and celebrate our sixth grade First In Math State Champions,” says proud sixth-grade math Teacher Monica Leija. “I am very excited about what these students have accomplished.“ The team averaged 7,885 Stickers per student.

“I want to especially congratulate the top three scorers on the 'ACE75TX' Championship team—who were also the top three players in the state: Johnny Ho (19,270 stickers), Christina Duong (18,866 stickers) and Renny Hoang (18,750 stickers),” says Leija. “These were their totals at the end of April, but I am happy to report that these students are continuing to achieve and earn more stickers.”

Uwe Langhammer, Wilson Instructional Technology Specialist, is excited about what all of the students have accomplished. “Wilson students solved more than THREE MILLION math problems during the FIM competition on their way to becoming the top-ranked intermediate school in Texas.”

First In Math Texas representative Tony Morrow monitored the school’s progress and stayed in contact throughout the year. “Many thanks to Tony, his constant support during the year was a big help,” says Langhammer.

Wilson Academy is an International Baccalaureate (IB) school. Founded in 1968, the IB is a program of international education “designed to help students develop intellectual, personal, emotional and social skills needed to live, learn and work in a rapidly globalizing world.”


March Math Madness Part of a Larger Goal
For DC Public Schools

WASHINGTON, DC—First In Math March Math Madness once again swept through the Washington D.C. Public Schools, creating a buzz around mathematics in classrooms throughout the district. “The play was incredible—and unpredictable,” says Lauren Allen, Coordinator of STEM Integration for the Office of Teaching and Learning, DCPS.

 “I am very excited to see how much this event has grown each year,” says First In Math creator Robert Sun. “I want to congratulate all participants, and recognize the top sticker-earner during the month of March, Beverly Lee, from Watkins ES.”

Top-scorer Beverly Lee
Left: Top-scorer Beverly Lee uses First in Math almost daily. According to her teacher, Elizabeth O'Donnell, Beverly loves to earn stickers for the class, and sometimes gets up at 6 a.m. to log in and play!  Right: The final bracket, and a Goals Index icon.

During the three-week elimination-style playoff, schools have to solve more math problems per-student than their opponent—over a two-day period—to advance. Grade level or proficiency doesn’t matter as there are hundreds of modules that can engage any skill level—what matters is effort and persistence in math practice. “We look only at growth during each round,” explains Allen.  After a tie between Eaton ES and Van Ness ES in the Elite Eight round, the Final Four became five as Key ES, Patterson ES, Stuart-Hobson MS, Eaton ES and Van Ness ES battled to advance to the Championship round.

Van Ness Elementary emerged victorious over Key ES in the Championship round. Teacher Michelle Johnson took to social media with this message: “Congrats to our hard working Van Ness Otters for winning the Math Madness Competition!”

March Math Madness was one of two First In Math competitions held this year to engage students. Patterson ES won the Fall Fact Face-Off, which motivated schools to integrate FIM into their classrooms. While exciting, competitions such as these are not the only tools to help reach schools, according to Suntex Executive Vice President Nan Ronis.

“At the start of this school year, DCPS Math Director David Goodrich established a district objective that called for all schools to reach a First In Math Goal Index of at least 50. Teams and students would focus on that target—the interest in sustained activity being part of the school-year priority,” explains Ronis.

Ronis says that the importance of positive math experiences for young students cannot be emphasized enough, which is why tracking progress, setting goals and making math a real-world experience matter. Sun agrees. “When young children are actively engaged—in motivating activities like the DCPS/First In Math event—we are setting them on the road to real exploring and learning. Motivating the youngest learners and instilling a love of math is so vital.”

In the grades 3-8 category, schools such as Ross ES (77.2) and Hardy MS (59.7) have already surpassed the goal. Many others—Stuart-Hobson MS (46.9), Key ES (43.6) and Eaton ES (42.7)—are getting close. It is no coincidence that many of these schools performed well in the Math Madness tournament. “Ross ES boasts a perfect 25 out of 25 on the Activity Index and a whopping 21.2 on the Fact Fluency Index – those are great numbers, and show that their students are ahead of the curve where basic math skills are concerned,” says Ronis.


See More Articles in the News Archive


FIM 2017 Champion:

Daniel Wang, Jr.

2017 Honorable Mention

Players
Daniel Wang, Jr. (PA)
Aran Jothi (VA)
Neel Anand (VA)
Ayan Swain (NJ)
Joshua Pajimola (CA)
Reyansh Bahl (NC)
Liberty Perez (NV)
Derek Garcia Rodrigez (MA)

Team Leaders
Jeffrey Keys (PA)
Samuel Allison (FL)
Adam Yaller (PA)
Annejeanette Washington (FL)
Abbi Stoloff (FL)
Adriana Figone (FL)
Lupita Vecchitto (CA)
Lisa Weingartner (FL)
Stephanie Sillo (PA)
Garth Jones (FL)

TOP EDUCATOR PLAYERS
Chris Sakers, (MD)
William Hanna (NM)
Carol A. Lauck (PA)
Alison Allen (FL)
Linda Isherwood (PA)
Mary Higgins (PA)
James Scanlon (PA)
Sister Georgiana M. Connell, IHM (PA)
Phyllis Elder (GA)

Schools
Dugan-Tarango Middle School (NM)
Notre Dame de Lourdes (PA)
St Didacus School (CA)
Manatee Bay Elementary (FL)
Mountain View Elem School (NJ)
St Francis Desales School (PA)
Mountain View Elem School (NJ)
Central Intermediate School (LA)
Indian Trace Elem School (FL)
St Laurence School (PA)

Visit the First in Math®
Hall of Fame!


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